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Shaping policy for development

An overview of Lagoro IDP camp in Kitgum District, northern Uganda, 20 May 2007. Manoocher Deghati/IRIN
Mon, 11/25/2013 - 14:59 -- Anonymous (not verified)
Homs Faces Renewed Round of Shelling
Homs Faces Renewed Round of Shelling

Smoke billows skyward as homes and buildings are shelled in the city of Homs, Syria.
License: Creative Commons
Credit: UN Photo/David Manyua
Source: UN Multimedia

ODI On... The crisis in Syria

18 October 2012

Since the civil war began there in March 2011, an estimated 100,000 people have been killed, five million have been displaced within Syria and over two million – half of them children – have fled to neighbouring countries. Humanitarian agencies have struggled to reach people in desperate need of assistance in both government- and rebel-controlled areas, hampered by ongoing conflict and government-imposed bureaucratic restrictions. During the almost three years of conflict, 32 Syrian Red Crescent volunteers have been killed and several aid workers have been kidnapped.

Outputs
Syrian refugees on the Turkish-Syria border
Syrian refugees on the Turkish-Syria border

Women and children sitting at Atme camp in full view of the Turkish border
License: Creative Commons
Credit: Jodi Hilton/IRIN
Source: IRIN

Responding to the humanitarian consequences of the conflict in Syria: have we failed the test?

Event - Public event - 28 November 2013 14:00 - 16:00 (GMT+00)
Why is Syria a seemingly impossible environment to operate in? What approaches are working – and what innovative ways of working can be explored? Have humanitarian agencies failed the test in Syria? These questions were explored in this event, which launched the 59th issue of Humanitarian Exchange on the conflict in Syria.
Steven A Zyck

The humanitarian response to the Syrian refugee crisis must not ignore the private sector

Opinion - Articles and blogs - 11 November 2013

The humanitarian response to the crisis in Syria and neighbouring countries has involved a range of forces and stakeholders, including diplomats, aid workers and civil servants. However the potential contribution of the business community – both globally and in affected countries – has been overlooked. During a series of recent interviews in Jordan, aid workers, donors and others seemed unsettled by the notion that businesses could play a role in the humanitarian response.

Sara Pantuliano

A day to honor Syria’s humanitarian workers

Opinion - Articles and blogs - 19 August 2013
Clad in crimson overalls, with a gleaming red crescent framed in white on their backs, the volunteers of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) hardly blend into the crowd. Yet despite being clearly marked as humanitarian workers, SARC volunteers continue to come under fire in one of the bloodiest civil wars ongoing today.

On the 3rd of March 2013, SARC staff member Mohieddine Mahmoud died while on duty when heavy shelling wracked Jobar neighbourhood in the suburbs of Damascus.

Conflict in Syria
Conflict in Syria

A Free Syrian Army fighter fires an anti-aircraft gun as a Syrian Air Force fighter bomber fires rockets during an air strike in the village of Tel Rafat, some 37 km (23 miles) north of Aleppo, August 9, 2012. Syrian troops and rebels fought over the country's biggest city Aleppo as President Bashar al-Assad's key foreign backer Iran gathered ministers from like-minded states for talks on Thursday about how to end the conflict.
License: Creative Commons
Credit: Abdullatif Anis
Source: Flickr

Syria crisis: an update on the humanitarian response

Event - Round-table - 31 August 2012 14:00 - 16:00 (GMT+00)

This event was convened to examine the humanitarian implications of the war in Syria. By August 2012 the conflict had spread to the two major cities, Damascus and Aleppo displacing thousands and triggering the flight of hundreds of thousands of refugees. 

Discussion at this second roundtable on Syria focused on the humanitarian response within Syria and regionally by bringing together representatives of the leading agencies in Damascus, Amman, Rome and London. The discussion provided an opportunity for humanitarian partners to explore how best to respond to the needs of all those caught up in the conflict. 

The first roundtable reflected on the current response of the international community and consider its impact on civilians caught up in the conflict.

UN Observer Group Makes Rounds in Homs, Syria on 21 April 2012
UN Observer Group Makes Rounds in Homs, Syria on 21 April 2012

Crowds of locals surround the recently-dispatched UN monitoring team as they walk through the streets of Homs, Syria. Pursuant to an authorization by the Security Council, the team of six unarmed observers were deployed to Syria on 16 April, tasked with reporting on the cessation of violence between Government and opposition forces.
License: Creative Commons
Credit: UN Photo/Neeraj Singh
Source: UN multimedia

Syria crisis: the humanitarian response

Event - Round-table - 15 June 2012 11:00 - 13:00 (GMT+01 (BST))

This closed-door roundtable on the Syria crisis brought together leading humanitarian aid agencies and senior figures with direct experience of humanitarian work in the country. The purpose of the meeting was to examine the response of the international community and consider its impact on the civilian population. 

Sanctuary in the city? Urban displacement and vulnerability in Damascus - A desk study

Publication - Discussion papers - 1 December 2011
Simone Haysom and Sara Pavanello
This study focuses on urbanisation, displacement and vulnerability in the Syrian capital, Damascus. Research aims to consider the reality of life for displaced populations in urban areas, investigate the policy and operational challenges that confront national and international stakeholders when responding to the needs of urban internally displaced people (IDPs) and refugees, and offer recommendations for strengthening support to these populations.
Overview

Since the civil war began there in March 2011, an estimated 100,000 people have been killed, five million have been displaced within Syria and over two million – half of them children – have fled to neighbouring countries. Humanitarian agencies have struggled to reach people in desperate need of assistance in both government- and rebel-controlled areas, hampered by ongoing conflict and government-imposed bureaucratic restrictions. During the almost three years of conflict, 32 Syrian Red Crescent volunteers have been killed and several aid workers have been kidnapped.

Humanitarian Policy Group