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Shaping policy for development

An overview of Lagoro IDP camp in Kitgum District, northern Uganda, 20 May 2007. Manoocher Deghati/IRIN
Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:36 -- Anonymous (not verified)
Sara Pantuliano
Sara Pantuliano

Sara Pantuliano

Sara is a political scientist with more than 20 years experience in conflict and post-conflict contexts. Prior to joining ODI in 2006, she led UNDP Sudan's Peace Building Unit, managed a high-profile post-conflict response in the Nuba Mountains and was a resource person and an observer at the IGAD Sudan peace process. She holds a PhD in Politics and has lectured at the University of Dar es Salaam. Sara has written extensively on Sudan and South Sudan and is a recognised public speaker and media commentator on humanitarian issues. She is the Managing Editor of Disasters and a Member of the Global Agenda Council on Catastrophic Risk of the World Economic Forum. She is also a Trustee of SOS Sahel and serves on a range of advisory boards, including the Humanitarian Innovation Fund, the Refugees Studies Centre and the UN Association of the UK.

Key areas of expertise: conflict analysis, transitions, global humanitarian action, protection, displacement, return and reintegration, land tenure, pastoralism, Middle East, Africa (especially Sudan and South Sudan).

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Participants at 2013 Advanced Course
Participants at 2013 Advanced Course

License: ODI photo

Advanced course on conflict, crisis and transitions - 2014

Event - Course - 16 - 23 July 2014
​The Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) at the Overseas Development Institute and the Post-war Reconstruction and Development Unit (PRDU) at the University of York are pleased to offer their fifth annual ‘Advanced Course on Conflict, Crisis and Transitions’. The week-long programme targeting mid-career and senior professionals will be held on the parkland campus of the University of York.
Sara Pantuliano

Sara Pantuliano on the changing humanitarian landscape

Opinion - Articles and blogs - 5 March 2014

There is a systemic shift afoot in the humanitarian world. This shift has been long in the making but we are only now beginning to recognise the changes in who is funding, organising, contributing to and delivering humanitarian aid.

Participants at the Humanitarian Action in the Arab Region conference
Participants at the Humanitarian Action in the Arab Region conference

License: Creative Commons
Credit: The Humanitarian Forum
Source: Flickr

Humanitarian action in the Arab region

Event - Conference - 20 - 21 January 2014

The conference brought together key humanitarian organisations as well as multilateral and regional organisations from Europe and the Middle East to discuss challenges and opportunities for humanitarian action in the Arab region.

Civilians fleeing fighting seek refuge at UNMISS Compound in Bor, South Sudan
Civilians fleeing fighting seek refuge at UNMISS Compound in Bor, South Sudan

License: Creative Commons
Credit: UN Photo/Hailemichael Gebrekrstos
Source: UN Multimedia

South Sudan: root causes and implications for the future

Event - Round-table - 16 January 2014 12:00 - 15:00 (GMT+00)
​This roundtable brought together a small group of South Sudan experts to discuss the root causes of the current crisis and its implications for the future of South Sudan.
Sara Pantuliano

Donor-driven technical fixes failed South Sudan: It’s time to get political

Opinion - Articles and blogs - 9 January 2014
What has gone wrong in South Sudan? As the country today marks the ninth anniversary of the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), which ended decades of conflict between southern insurgents and the government of Sudan and paved the way to independence, South Sudan is experiencing another wave of violence and conflict – this time within its own borders.

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