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Shaping policy for development

An overview of Lagoro IDP camp in Kitgum District, northern Uganda, 20 May 2007. Manoocher Deghati/IRIN
Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:36 -- Anonymous (not verified)
Ashley Jackson
Ashley Jackson

Ashley Jackson

Research Fellow, Humanitarian Policy Group

Ashley Jackson recently joined the Humanitarian Policy Group as a Research Fellow. She has substantial emergency and humanitarian program and policy experience, including work in natural disaster, conflict and post-conflict situations. Prior to joining ODI, she spent several years in Afghanistan working in the Department of Political Affairs in the UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan (UNAMA) and as Head of Policy for Oxfam. She has also worked with the Red Cross on disaster relief and recovery operations in Southeast Asia and the United Nations Development Programme on gender issues in New York. She holds an MSc in Gender and Development from the London School of Economics.

Her current research with HPG focuses on humanitarian principles and negotiations with armed non-state actors. In addition, she serves as an advisor to the UK Parliament International Development Committee on Afghanistan and contributes to the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium's work on Afghanistan.

Outputs

Protecting civilians: the gap between norms and practice

Publication - Research reports and studies - 21 April 2014
Attacks on civilians have become an all too commonplace occurrence in conflicts, illustrated vividly in crises in Syria and the Central African Republic. Yet at the same time there has been a range of developments in laws and policies focused on improving the protection of civilians (PoC) in armed conflicts since the 1990s. This policy brief examines the gap between the reality for civilians on the ground and PoC norms and policies and suggests areas for further work to help translate rhetoric into reality.
A first grade student at one of the IRC’s schools in Kabul. UNICEF says only one in five Afghan women can read or write, and that’s a substantive improvement from a decade ago. Literacy rates for men approach 50%, but that remains one of the lowest ra
A first grade student at one of the IRC’s schools in Kabul. UNICEF says only one in five Afghan women can read or write, and that’s a substantive improvement from a decade ago. Literacy rates for men approach 50%, but that remains one of the lowest ra

children, girls, reading, child, education
License: Creative Commons
Credit: @NHolt/IRC
Source: IRC

Afghanistan after 2014: what's next?

Event - Public event - 2 April 2014 18:00 - 20:00 (GMT+01 (BST))
​2014 is a year of major transition for Afghanistan. In a report to be released on 2 April, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) argues that while 2014 is a challenging year for Afghanistan, it is also an opportunity for the international community to stand beside the Afghan people, building on successful, community-based approaches to humanitarian assistance and development.

Humanitarian negotiations with armed non-state actors: key lessons from Afghanistan, Sudan and Somalia

Publication - Briefing papers - 18 March 2014
Drawn from over 500 interviews with aid workers, members of armed groups (including the Taliban, Al-Shabaab and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North) and others, this policy brief highlights key lessons from a two-year research project on humanitarian negotiations with armed non-state actors in Afghanistan, Somalia and Sudan.

Talking to the other side: Humanitarian negotiations with Al-Shabaab in Somalia

Publication - Research reports and studies - 9 December 2013
Ashley Jackson and Abdi Aynte
The Humanitarian Policy Group partnering with the Heritage Institute for Policy Studies in Mogadishu, Somalia, has undertaken research into humanitarian engagement with Al-Shabaab during the 2011 famine.What are the difficulties facing aid agencies seeking to operate in Al-Shabaab controlled areas in Somalia? Drawn from over 80 interviews with former Al-Shabaab officials, aid workers and civilians, this research details Al-Shabaab’s tactics of intimidation, demanding payments and regulation of aid agencies during the 2011 Horn of Africa famine.

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